What Is Commissioner Service?

According to "The Language Of Scouting", A commissioner is a volunteer Scouter who works with packs, troops, and teams/crews to help the units succeed. In addition to the council commissioner, there are district commissioners, assistant district commissioners, roundtable commissioners, huddle commissioners, program commissioners, and unit commissioners.

The Commissioner Concept

According to the "Commissioner Fieldbook for Unit Service" (33617), the only reason for having commissioners is to help units succeed. A unit is the basic structure operated by a chartered organization to deliver the program of the Boy Scouts of America to youth members. The BSA works with and through the chartered organization to serve youth. It is important that the chartered organization and its units be served effectively by the commissioner.

Concept Statement

The concept for today's commissioner service focuses on the unit. The commissioner's specific mission is to keep units operating at maximum efficiency so that they can deliver a good program to a growing membership.

Today's commissioners are results-oriented rather than procedures-oriented. They are successful in their mission when units continue to operate, units regularly accept new boys, and units effectively deliver the ideals of Scouting to their members.

Commissioners are also involved with carrying programs to the unit, but their main concern is to develop strength within the unit operation.

In other words, the concept calls for commissioners to develop program capability in a unit. They are neither program specialists nor production experts, although they are concerned and knowledgeable in both fields. Their activity is focused, not on program or production, but on the unit.

Strength

Commissioners must be sufficient in number to fill the needs of the council and district. They must be trained and guided in their efforts.

Unit commissioners are accountable for the success of their assigned units. There is no perfect formula for numbers of commissioners or frequency of unit contacts. Numbers and methods should be determined by the needs of units to be served.

The commissioner structure of the district must be dictated by the needs of the council and district and the units to be served.